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Criminal (In)justice

Problems with police, prosecutors and courts have people asking: is our criminal justice system broken? University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris interviews the people who know the system best, and hears their best ideas for fixing it. Criminal (In)justice is an independent production created in partnership with 90.5 WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station.
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Now displaying: February, 2017
Feb 28, 2017

We hear a lot about crime trends, almost always involving homicides or felonies. But the vast majority of criminal offenses are misdemeanors. These convictions can have a major impact on employment, education, you name it - yet they are hardly studied at all. We talk with the leader of the new Misdemeanor Justice Project, Dr. Preeti Chauhan.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Feb 24, 2017

An update on our former guest Christina Swarns of the NAACP (episode 34), who just won a key victory with this week's U.S. Supreme Court decision in Buck v. Davis.

Feb 21, 2017

What should a police department be? What’s the mission, and how should it be carried out? From the last administration's "President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing" to protests across the country, it’s been a non-stop national conversation.

We talk with Sheriff Jerry Clayton, a law enforcement professional who’s re-shaped a police agency from the inside out. 

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Feb 17, 2017

President Trump says self-styled "sanctuary cities" are breaking the law. But are cities under any actual obligation to enforce federal immigration law? And is there any evidence for Trump's claim that sanctuary status is linked with higher incidence of crime? David answers these questions and explains why many local law enforcement agencies want nothing to do with immigration enforcement.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Feb 14, 2017

We know the current system for police interrogation can lead to false confessions, even for the most heinous crimes. There’s a better way to question suspects: the PEACE method. Developed in the UK, it’s revolutionizing police questioning across the world.

Jonathan Davison tells us why the PEACE method’s time has come.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Feb 7, 2017

Facial recognition technology is being used by police all over the U.S. using images of millions of innocent Americans. It’s a lot less accurate than what we see on TV, and it may be pointing police at a disproportionate number of minority citizens. Georgetown's Alvaro Bedoya explains.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

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