Info

Criminal (In)justice

Problems with police, prosecutors and courts have people asking: is our criminal justice system broken? University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris interviews the people who know the system best, and hears their best ideas for fixing it. Criminal (In)justice is an independent production created in partnership with 90.5 WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station.
RSS Feed
Criminal (In)justice
2019
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: May, 2016
May 25, 2016

On May 23, a judge found the second officer tried in the death of Freddie Gray not guilty.  In this bonus episode, Criminal Injustice host David Harris discusses the verdict on 90.5 WESA's Essential Pittsburgh with host Paul Guggenheimer.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

May 17, 2016

For decades, police in the U.S. have used force under the Supreme Court’s rule that they can do as much as appears “reasonably necessary” to accomplish their lawful goals. But after almost two years of national attention on police shootings of blacks, a major police professional organization has proposed, for the first time, that police use force less often and with more restraint. Is this a turning point?

Chuck Wexler is Executive Director of the Police Executives Research Forum, based in Washington, D.C.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

May 10, 2016

America is No. 1 in the world when it comes to incarcerating its own citizens. With one-in-three black men in the U.S. likely to go to prison during his lifetime, the system begs for reform, burdens taxpayers, and weakens our country - particularly our communities of color. After decades of resistance, the system may see changes and shrinking prison populations because of bipartisan support for improvement.

Marc Mauer is Executive Director of the Washington D.C.-based Sentencing Project.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

May 3, 2016

When someone dies or has their constitutional rights violated in an encounter with the police, police can be sued. But why are these suits so tough to win, even in the worst cases of police misconduct? And what does the multiple millions of dollars in damages every year say about the state of police abuse in the U.S.?

David Rudovsky is a national leader in civil rights and civil liberties litigation. He is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and a founding partner in Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing & Feinberg.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

1