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Criminal (In)justice

Problems with police, prosecutors and courts have people asking: is our criminal justice system broken? University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris interviews the people who know the system best, and hears their best ideas for fixing it. Criminal (In)justice is an independent production created in partnership with 90.5 WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station.
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Now displaying: April, 2017
Apr 25, 2017

High-speed pursuits are among the riskiest police activities. Some pursuits catch bad guys, but in others, many thousands have been killed or severely injured – including innocent civilians. Are chases worth the deaths and injuries to citizens and officers?

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com

Apr 18, 2017

Americans who live in areas facing high rates of crime are portrayed as anti-police, but a new study shows something far different: strong respect for the law and a willingness to help with public safety.

Journalist Brentin Mock reports on these misconceptions for CityLab and others.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Apr 11, 2017

American criminal trial juries are composed of 12 ordinary citizens tasked with bringing justice to the downtrodden and common sense to the law – no easy job. But who actually gets to serve? Research out of North Carolina shows some people get removed from jury pools much more often than others.

Ron Wright is jury selection analyst and the Needham Yancey Gulley Professor of Criminal Law at Wake Forest School of Law. 

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Apr 3, 2017

Racial reconciliation – an attempt to speak plainly about racial strife between police and citizens of color – is a necessary step toward comprehensive police reform. It’s important, and no doubt difficult – but what does it actually look and feel like on the ground?

Aseante Hylick builds these conversations across the U.S.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Apr 1, 2017

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is warning local law enforcement agencies to comply with requests from federal immigration authorities to assist them in detaining people suspected of being in the country illegally -- or face consequences. But as David explains, there could also be serious consequences for communities that do comply.

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