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Criminal (In)justice

Problems with police, prosecutors and courts have people asking: is our criminal justice system broken? University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris interviews the people who know the system best, and hears their best ideas for fixing it. Criminal (In)justice is an independent production created in partnership with 90.5 WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station.
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Now displaying: September, 2017
Sep 28, 2017

Updates on a pair of stories we've covered in the last year: Lawyers Behaving Badly alumnus Roy Moore becomes Alabama's GOP nominee for U.S. Senate, and a D.C. court ruling puts new limits on police use of "Stingray" surveillance technology (see episode 48).

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Sep 26, 2017

Police killings of unarmed African American men, stop-and-frisk policies and racially disproportionate prison populations have all been called symptoms of a broken criminal justice system.

Georgetown law professor and "Chokehold" author Paul Butler says no – this is exactly the way the system was designed to work.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Sep 23, 2017

The acquittal of a St. Louis police officer charged with shooting a civilian has raised the question: why wasn't the case heard by a jury? David explains why police facing trial often opt to be tried by a judge.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Sep 19, 2017

Mass incarceration in the U.S. created crisis conditions in prisons everywhere, and modern prison systems now have to address much more than just locking inmates up. 

State Corrections Secretary John Wetzel explains the unique challenges of housing Pennsylvania's inmate population, and what his team does to get them ready for life on the outside.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Sep 15, 2017

Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller is teaming up with the New York Attorney General's office. What does it mean for the investigation into the Trump White House's Russia connection?

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Sep 12, 2017

Killings of unarmed black people by police have worsened historically troubled police-community relations. Until recently, little research existed that might help, but this has begun to change.

Philip Atiba Goff explains how social psychology can change American policing.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Sep 5, 2017

After Ferguson, investigations revealed that the entire criminal justice system in St. Louis County – not just the police department – levied massive amounts of fines and fees on its poorest citizens in order to fund itself.  It was a wake-up call, but one organization was already there working on these very issues.

Thomas Harvey is the co-founder and executive director of Arch City Defenders.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Sep 4, 2017

The presidential pardon of Sheriff Joe Arpaio was a message to Donald Trump's supporters: if you defy a federal court order, I've got your back. David explains how the notorious Maricopa County, Ariz., sheriff was convicted of contempt of court, and why his pardon sets a dangerous precedent.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

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