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Criminal (In)justice

Problems with police, prosecutors and courts have people asking: is our criminal justice system broken? University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris interviews the people who know the system best, and hears their best ideas for fixing it. Criminal (In)justice is an independent production created in partnership with 90.5 WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station.
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Now displaying: June, 2016
Jun 30, 2016

David breaks down this week's news from the U.S. Supreme Court on 90.5 WESA's Essential Pittsburgh.

The high court ended its 2015-2016 term Tuesday with major rulings on abortion, affirmative action, government corruption, and more.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Jun 28, 2016

In each of 93 federal districts in America, the United States Attorney is the chief federal prosecutor and law enforcement officer. The U.S. Attorney has immense responsibilities and great power, deciding what cases to pursue, who to charge, and what priorities to set. At least as important, the U.S. Attorney decides who not to charge, and when to drop cases for lack of evidence. The job isn’t just to get convictions; it’s to do justice.

David J. Hickton is the U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Jun 21, 2016

With hundreds of exonerations of the wrongfully convicted, it’s easy to think that the law and lawyers making use of DNA have made all the difference. But investigative journalists have made huge contributions: exposing shoddy forensics, showing the public how eyewitness testimony goes wrong and how false confessions get made, and confronting police wrongdoing and lack of accountability. Without the untiring efforts of reporters, much of the injustice in the criminal system would stay hidden.

Maurice Possley is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter and four-time Pulitzer finalist who spent 25 years at the Chicago Tribune. He is currently writer/researcher for the National Registry of Exonerations.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Jun 14, 2016

With the public discussion of police misconduct and public trust at a fever pitch, the loudest voices dominate. We need the insight of a person with the experience of a police officer, with deep knowledge of the law and social science, and with the oral and verbal skills of a great public communicator. Enter Seth Stoughton.

As a former law enforcement officer and current assistant law professor, Stoughton knows what works, how to track it, and when (and how) to talk about it.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

Jun 7, 2016

As a federal judge, Robert Cindrich was at the pinnacle of his career. Then he did something almost unheard-of in the legal profession: he quit.

What could compel a respected jurist to walk away from one of the most prestigious and powerful positions in his field? Former U.S. District Judge Robert Cindrich explains on this week's episode.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

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