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Criminal (In)justice

Problems with police, prosecutors and courts have people asking: is our criminal justice system broken? University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris interviews the people who know the system best, and hears their best ideas for fixing it. Criminal (In)justice is an independent production created in partnership with 90.5 WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station.
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Now displaying: May, 2017
May 30, 2017

Criminal justice reform – it’s always been a liberal issue. But in the last few years, reform efforts have started to emerge on the right, too. It’s one of the few issues seeing bipartisan agreement in our polarized country.

Arthur Rizer, justice policy director and senior fellow at the R Street Institute, makes the conservative case for reform.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

May 25, 2017

With a jury now seated for the sexual assualt trial of Bill Cosby, we preview some of the arguments prosecutors and defense attorneys are expected to make.

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May 23, 2017

Drones were developed as weapons of war, but they've begun to find their way into domestic police work as well. They could help officers trace suspects or missing persons or assess threats like toxic spills, but they also pose a threat to privacy.

Matthew Feeney of the Cato Institute says those technological toys come with some serious concerns.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

May 18, 2017

Analysis of Attorney General Jeff Sessions's May 10th memo directing federal prosecutors to pursue the strictest charges and the harshest sentences "the evidence supports."

May 16, 2017

The exposure of wrongful convictions began in 1989, and it upended the idea that guilty verdicts were always trustworthy. When there’s a wrongful conviction, what has to happen to get a court to exonerate someone?

Marissa Boyers Bluestine is the Litigation Director for the Pennsylvania Innocence Project, and she tells us what it’s really like, on the ground, working to establish innocence – after a guilty verdict.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

May 11, 2017

President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey has serious implications for the relationship between the FBI and the White House. What should we keep in mind as the story unfolds?

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May 9, 2017

The last few years have exposed problems in policing: use of force, high-tech surveillance, and a lack of transparency.

NYU Law Professor Barry Friedman argues that the fault for this lies not just with the police, or the courts – it’s on us.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

May 4, 2017

Arkansas is rushing to carry out eight executions in just two weeks. Why the hurry? The lethal injection drugs used by the state are nearing their expiration date.

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May 2, 2017

The Stingray is a new technology that allows police to gather all the cell phone signals in a whole area at any time – without a warrant or any accountability. And if you ask for information about it: permission denied.

Adam Bates studies the secret use of Stingray devices at the Cato Institute in Washington D.C.

Find more at criminalinjusticepodcast.com.

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